If Van Gogh Used Rubber Stamps

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If Van Gogh Made Cards

I love Van Gogh’s paintings, and have copied 2 of them to learn more about how he thought. So when I needed to create an ad for RSM’s fall issue I had a flash of inspiration: how about a Starry Night scene using my ancient sites stamps.

I did a test run on scrap paper to get the positioning right and to plan the card.

Stonehenge Starry Night How-To

•    Stamp Stonehenge with water-based black ink on matte card stock.
•    Mask Stonehenge and emboss the Labyrinth with orange pigment ink and clear powder.
•    Stamp and emboss the Abelermo Stone (who seems to be photo-bombing the picture) with black pigment ink and black detail embossing powder.
•    Color with pencils.
•    Start with yellow & orange pencils to sketch the outline of the shadow area and color the Labyrinth “moon”, Starry Night stars (which could be stamped first with the Single Spiral stamp), and halo the big stone.
•    Using a light blue pencil I colored over the Stonehenge to soften the inked image, colored the shadow, and started the sky.
•    Using dark blue and 2 different greens I colored the rest of the scene using bold lines and strokes to emulate the brushwork of Van Gogh.

All these stamps available in my Etsy Shop

Looking for Inspiration?

Masterwork paintings are a great resource to inspire your application and coloring.
Use your internet search engine to find images from Monet, Renoir, Rembrandt, Cezanne, any artist that inspires you.
Think about what it is that attracts you the most. Is it the style, elements, use of color, or something else?
Then apply those ideas to your own card making.
Matisse turned to cut paper collage to express himself. This would be an easy thing for you to incorporate into your card-making.
I think I’ll look into doing more of these Masterwork-inspired pieces.
Would you like that?

Let me know in Facebook.
Thanks for being here and reading all the way through.
Happy Stamping!
Kim

Tie-Dye T-Shirt Card

RubberStampMadness issue #200  Page 25

Tips & Techniques article by Christina Hecht and Kim Victoria, designed by Kim Victoria

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Supplies you will need: T-Shirt Template, Mat Card Stock or Mixed-Media Paper, Watercolor Markers (Crayola work great) I used yellows, pinks & light blues or turquoise, Large Blank Rubber Sheet or Craft Sheet, Fine Spray Water Mister, Brayer, Scissors, Pencil, Bone Folder, Black felt-tip marker

Step 1: Template

Make a T-shirt template or get both the A2 and 5” X 6-1/2” for free – www.HighlanderCelticStamps.com/t-shirt-card.pdf

The link should work. If you have difficulty please email me and I’ll send it to you..

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Step 2: Make the card

Using template for the size you want, fold card stock well with a bone folder, place template “shoulders” on fold, trace around template with pencil, cut out both layers at once.

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Step 3: Set up your ink surface

When using a craft sheet – slip template underneath so you see where to color. When using a rubber sheet – trace around template with a watercolor marker, remove template.
Idea: If you plan to emboss an image on top of the tie-dye later, slip a stamping of that image under the craft sheet in the location where you want it on the T-shirt so you can see where to put the yellow center.

Step 4: Ink the tie-dye

Now is the fun part. Using the lightest color marker (yellow), lay color down on the rubber or craft sheet in the pattern of tie-dye leaving a wide white space between the yellow spiral. Lay down the next color in pattern by scrubbing a jiggly, irregular, back-and-forth movement, going into the yellow. Add the third color in the same way. Don’t worry about the ink drying, you have lots of time to get the pattern the way you want it, and you do want a lot of ink.

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Step 5: Do the print

Tricky part. Clear away everything around the rubber or craft sheet, hold the water mister well away from inked surface and spray lightly OVER the surface, not on it. You want the surface evenly moist, not runny. You don’t want the colors to start merging together too much.

Carefully line up your T-shirt card folder and lay it down in one go. Lay scrap paper over the top and brayer firmly to transfer the ink to paper. (The back of a spoon works well too.)

 

Carefully lift card from sheet and voila! You have tie-dye. Let paper dry, or use heat gun.

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Step 6: Add details

Remember to add “stitching” lines along the hem, sleeve and neck edges with a black felt-tip marker.

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Step 7: Add a feature image

Add words, an image, or multiple images. I found embossing an image made it stand out from the tie-dye best.

Tips & Ideas:

Experiment with small pieces of your card stock and small scribbles of marker. I found heavy-weight card stock or mixed media paper work best. You might need to coax the card flat again when it dries, but not by much.

 

Of course you can go wild and try all sorts of colors and designs with this technique.

 

Have fun! ! !

Thank you RubberStampMadness Magazine

for featuring my design in issue #200. It is a great honor to be published.

Kim Victoria

Owner/Artist/Wearer of all hats at Highlander Celtic Stamps