Celtic Wedding

Celtic Love Symbols for Weddings & A Craft Project For You
By Kathi Hennesey

As wedding season gets into full swing, future brides and grooms, along with their families, are busy planning their special day and looking for ways to make it unique and memorable. One popular and time-honored practice is to include symbols of family cultural heritage. And so the wedding day joins two people, celebrates their newly-shared ancestry, and strengthens the bonds between generations.

Our rubber stamps focus on Scottish, Irish and Welsh love symbols, so we want to share ways to incorporate using them for a wedding. The wonderful thing is that these expressions of love and affection can be used before, during and after the big day. As symbols of the new couple‘s bond, they‘re perfect for special occasion gifts and cards, such as anniversaries, birthdays, Valentine‘s Day, Christmas and baby showers.

Most readers here will be familiar with the popular symbols of the love bond used by these cultures for wedding ceremonies: The Scottish luckenbooth, the Irish claddagh and the Welsh love spoon.

Scottish Luckenbooth

The Scottish luckenbooth usually includes one or two hearts with a crown on top, and can include other embellishments such as a thistle. The tradition of the Scottish luckenbooth dates back to the 15th century, when these types of brooches – usually made of silver – were given as betrothal or wedding gifts, then pinned to the newborn children for protection.

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Irish Claddagh

The  Irish claddagh features a crown and a heart held by two hands. Legend tells us that the crown stands for loyalty, the heart for love, and the hands for friendship. The claddagh ring has been a traditional design for engagement and wedding rings, in Ireland, for generations. It continues to be extremely popular today.

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Welsh Love Spoon

The Welsh love spoon, carved from wood, can include a variety of designs on the handle, including hearts, locks, crosses, bells, dragons, wheels and Celtic knotwork. It was traditionally given to a young woman by her suitor. The earliest known dated Welsh love spoon dates from 1667.

Knotwork Hearts

For a more universal Celtic-theme – and less specifically Scottish, Irish or Welsh – there are wonderful knotwork heart designs to symbolize unending love or the joining of two people in the love bond. The familiar symbol of the heart representing love and romance developed in 15th century Europe and its popular use with Celtic knotwork is a perfect marriage of designs.

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Wedding Stationery

So with a few specific motifs in mind, we return to the idea of using them for a wedding. The perfect place to introduce a special love symbol is on stationery: the engagement announcements, then the wedding/shower invitations and save-the-date cards. Many couples choose to design and create these items themselves, or have them custom made with their unique symbol and added personalization. The Scottish luckenbooth, Irish claddagh, Welsh love spoon and Celtic knotwork hearts, with all their variations, are all beautiful and elegant designs for stationery and paper products.

Creative Ideas

For the big day itself, the possibilities are endless. From the guest book, to the décor, wedding favors and gifts, this is a place for creativity to shine.

Here are some places where Celtic, Scottish, Irish and Welsh love symbols can be used:

  • Guest book cover and guest book table décor (setting the stage!)
  • Decorations: Banners, wedding favors, table cards and card holders.
  • Wedding reception: Engraved glasses for bride and groom toasts, unity candles.
  • Wedding cake: Cake topper, cake pulls (special themed charms), cake embellishments, engraved/decorated cake serving sets..
  • Gifts for bride and groom: Household items, such as engraved glassware, wall plaques, photo frames, framed prints, keepsake ornaments.
  • Jewelry worn by the bride and her bridesmaids, wedding rings (especially the Irish claddagh).
  • Groomsmen gifts: Engraved money clips, flasks/barware, business card holders, and pocket watches.

After the wedding, love symbols can continue the theme in wedding scrapbooks and memory books, thank-you cards and even anniversary gifts.  Keepsake items from the wedding, such as toasting glasses engraved with love symbols, can be displayed in the newly-married couple’s home.

Just The Beginning

This article just scratches the surface, but hopefully it will provide a few ideas and some inspiration for anyone involved with an upcoming wedding. There’s no lack of wonderful websites with many more ideas and DIY projects that can be found through Internet searches. Pinterest is also a great place to browse for themed wedding boards and great visuals.

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Let us end with an Irish wedding toast:

Here’s to you both, a beautiful pair
On the birthday of your love affair
Here’s to the husband and here’s to the wife
May yourselves be lovers for the rest of your life

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Muslin Bag Crafting How-To

Get the Free PDF for stamping on muslin bags – CLICK HERE

 

These handy little bags are great for lots of uses:

  • jewelry – keep it protected
  • jewelry – gift bags
  • wedding favors – fill with Jordan almonds or chocolate
  • wedding favors – fill with rice or bird seed to throw
  • gift bags – whatever your imagination decides
  • bag for selling items – rubber stamps set and a mini ink pad

Want more ideas for muslin bags?
Put the following in your search engine, and click on images.

MUSLIN BAGS DIY IMAGES

Click on images below and save (if PDF file won’t come up for you) (I apologize, but I am having a dickens of a time trying to get PDFs to load properly in this web builder. I’m just not tech-savvy enough. Thank you for your understanding.)

MuslinBagDIY2018
MuslinBagDIY2018

Tie-Dye T-Shirt Card

RubberStampMadness issue #200  Page 25

Tips & Techniques article by Christina Hecht and Kim Victoria, designed by Kim Victoria

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Supplies you will need: T-Shirt Template, Mat Card Stock or Mixed-Media Paper, Watercolor Markers (Crayola work great) I used yellows, pinks & light blues or turquoise, Large Blank Rubber Sheet or Craft Sheet, Fine Spray Water Mister, Brayer, Scissors, Pencil, Bone Folder, Black felt-tip marker

Step 1: Template

Make a T-shirt template or get both the A2 and 5” X 6-1/2” for free – www.HighlanderCelticStamps.com/t-shirt-card.pdf

The link should work. If you have difficulty please email me and I’ll send it to you..

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Step 2: Make the card

Using template for the size you want, fold card stock well with a bone folder, place template “shoulders” on fold, trace around template with pencil, cut out both layers at once.

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Step 3: Set up your ink surface

When using a craft sheet – slip template underneath so you see where to color. When using a rubber sheet – trace around template with a watercolor marker, remove template.
Idea: If you plan to emboss an image on top of the tie-dye later, slip a stamping of that image under the craft sheet in the location where you want it on the T-shirt so you can see where to put the yellow center.

Step 4: Ink the tie-dye

Now is the fun part. Using the lightest color marker (yellow), lay color down on the rubber or craft sheet in the pattern of tie-dye leaving a wide white space between the yellow spiral. Lay down the next color in pattern by scrubbing a jiggly, irregular, back-and-forth movement, going into the yellow. Add the third color in the same way. Don’t worry about the ink drying, you have lots of time to get the pattern the way you want it, and you do want a lot of ink.

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Step 5: Do the print

Tricky part. Clear away everything around the rubber or craft sheet, hold the water mister well away from inked surface and spray lightly OVER the surface, not on it. You want the surface evenly moist, not runny. You don’t want the colors to start merging together too much.

Carefully line up your T-shirt card folder and lay it down in one go. Lay scrap paper over the top and brayer firmly to transfer the ink to paper. (The back of a spoon works well too.)

 

Carefully lift card from sheet and voila! You have tie-dye. Let paper dry, or use heat gun.

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Step 6: Add details

Remember to add “stitching” lines along the hem, sleeve and neck edges with a black felt-tip marker.

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Step 7: Add a feature image

Add words, an image, or multiple images. I found embossing an image made it stand out from the tie-dye best.

Tips & Ideas:

Experiment with small pieces of your card stock and small scribbles of marker. I found heavy-weight card stock or mixed media paper work best. You might need to coax the card flat again when it dries, but not by much.

 

Of course you can go wild and try all sorts of colors and designs with this technique.

 

Have fun! ! !

Thank you RubberStampMadness Magazine

for featuring my design in issue #200. It is a great honor to be published.

Kim Victoria

Owner/Artist/Wearer of all hats at Highlander Celtic Stamps