Tie-Dye T-Shirt Card

RubberStampMadness issue #200  Page 25

Tips & Techniques article by Christina Hecht and Kim Victoria, designed by Kim Victoria

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Supplies you will need: T-Shirt Template, Mat Card Stock or Mixed-Media Paper, Watercolor Markers (Crayola work great) I used yellows, pinks & light blues or turquoise, Large Blank Rubber Sheet or Craft Sheet, Fine Spray Water Mister, Brayer, Scissors, Pencil, Bone Folder, Black felt-tip marker

Step 1: Template

Make a T-shirt template or get both the A2 and 5” X 6-1/2” for free – www.HighlanderCelticStamps.com/t-shirt-card.pdf

The link should work. If you have difficulty please email me and I’ll send it to you..

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Step 2: Make the card

Using template for the size you want, fold card stock well with a bone folder, place template “shoulders” on fold, trace around template with pencil, cut out both layers at once.

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Step 3: Set up your ink surface

When using a craft sheet – slip template underneath so you see where to color. When using a rubber sheet – trace around template with a watercolor marker, remove template.
Idea: If you plan to emboss an image on top of the tie-dye later, slip a stamping of that image under the craft sheet in the location where you want it on the T-shirt so you can see where to put the yellow center.

Step 4: Ink the tie-dye

Now is the fun part. Using the lightest color marker (yellow), lay color down on the rubber or craft sheet in the pattern of tie-dye leaving a wide white space between the yellow spiral. Lay down the next color in pattern by scrubbing a jiggly, irregular, back-and-forth movement, going into the yellow. Add the third color in the same way. Don’t worry about the ink drying, you have lots of time to get the pattern the way you want it, and you do want a lot of ink.

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Step 5: Do the print

Tricky part. Clear away everything around the rubber or craft sheet, hold the water mister well away from inked surface and spray lightly OVER the surface, not on it. You want the surface evenly moist, not runny. You don’t want the colors to start merging together too much.

Carefully line up your T-shirt card folder and lay it down in one go. Lay scrap paper over the top and brayer firmly to transfer the ink to paper. (The back of a spoon works well too.)

 

Carefully lift card from sheet and voila! You have tie-dye. Let paper dry, or use heat gun.

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Step 6: Add details

Remember to add “stitching” lines along the hem, sleeve and neck edges with a black felt-tip marker.

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Step 7: Add a feature image

Add words, an image, or multiple images. I found embossing an image made it stand out from the tie-dye best.

Tips & Ideas:

Experiment with small pieces of your card stock and small scribbles of marker. I found heavy-weight card stock or mixed media paper work best. You might need to coax the card flat again when it dries, but not by much.

 

Of course you can go wild and try all sorts of colors and designs with this technique.

 

Have fun! ! !

Thank you RubberStampMadness Magazine

for featuring my design in issue #200. It is a great honor to be published.

Kim Victoria

Owner/Artist/Wearer of all hats at Highlander Celtic Stamps

The Ancient roots of the Leek

Wearing of the Leek?

One of the traditional ways that Welsh people celebrate their national pride on St. David’s Day is by wearing a leek. There are two intriguing tales from Welsh lore about this custom, one taking us all the way back to the 6th century.

Leek-side

A badge

The first story goes that soldiers of the ancient British king, Cadwaladyr, were about to fight their traditional enemy, the Saxons. Dewi Sant (St. David) advised the Welsh to wear a leek in order to recognize their fellow countrymen during the battle. Many have doubted this tale, as St. David and his followers lead a quiet monastic life, far away from such battle scenes; also, this legend wasn’t recorded until the 17th century.

A field of green

Another legend recounts the tale of brave Welsh archers who helped Edward the Black (the first English Prince of Wales) defeat the French in 1346. Because the archers fought in a field of leeks, this symbol became a reminder of their bravery and loyalty, and the Welsh began to wear a leek in their caps every St. David’s Day.

Ancient roots

It is very likely that the Welsh association with the leek predates St. David by hundreds and possibly thousands of years, to a pre-Christian time when Celtic people lived close to the land and had a deep affinity with trees, plants and other such aspects of Mother Nature. The leek may have had a special status with the Celtic tribes in the area we now know as Wales, although this is speculation.

One scenario is that the druids – who were priests, doctors, poets, teachers, minstrels, and human archives of ancient wisdom – shared and used their knowledge of the healing properties of the leek. Such qualities were alluded to in ancient holy books such as the Bible and the Torah, and leeks were depicted on ancient Egyptian wall carvings and drawings. They were even cultivated in ancient Mesopotamia.

The leek, with its reputation as a medicine to cure a variety of illnesses, would have been highly valued before the era of St. David. It was regarded as a cure for the common cold, alleviated the pains of childbirth and would later be used as a tasty, healthy ingredient in cawl, the traditional Welsh broth. It offered protection against wounds in battle and was supposed to help one keep away evil spirits. One of its benefits was to aid in foretelling the future; young maidens were to place a leek under their pillow at night to see the features of their future husbands.

The proud leek

So when you see this humble plant worn as a proud symbol of Welsh heritage, or see it as an emblem in a coin, flag or banner, you can appreciate its “Celtic connection” to an ancient past.

Researched and written by Kathi Hennesey, owner of Triskelt shops

Fun things to do ~ crafts, recipes

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We found resources for cool activities to get you in the Welsh mood.
Check out these links:
www.Wales.com for free PDF how-tos, recipes, and more

  • Castle pencil holder
  • Pom Pom Welsh Sheep
  • Paper Welsh Dragon
  • Paper Daffodil
  • Welsh Flag
  • Welsh Bunting
  • Welsh cakes
  • Bara brith
  • Welsh rarebit
  • lots more

 

Teachers and Crafters
Here is an United Kingdom site full of home-school activities for all year.

The amount of fun stuff here is amazing! And you don’t need to be a child to enjoy it all.

www.twinkl.co.uk